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Topic: The Judiciary

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View of an empty classroom. View of an empty classroom.

@UMICHLAW Fall 2023

Affirmative Action: The Cliff Where Diversity in Higher Education Now Teeters

Senior Assistant Dean Sarah Zearfoss, ’92, has led the Law School’s admissions and financial aid offices since 2001. In this essay, which originally appeared on bet.com, she weighs in on two recent Supreme Court cases, Students for Fair Admission v. Harvard and Students for Fair Admission v. University of North Carolina.

A portrait of John Bulgozdy, ’84. A portrait of John Bulgozdy, ’84.

Impact

John Bulgozdy, ’84: From Poetry Class to the Courtroom

On the surface, litigation and poetry don’t have much in common. But John Bulgozdy says that the analytical skills he used throughout his legal career can be traced to an undergraduate poetry class at the University of Michigan.

A portrait of Susanne Baer, LLM ’93. A portrait of Susanne Baer, LLM ’93.

Features Fall 2023

Susanne Baer, LLM ’93: “It's the Highest Honor to Serve”

With her election as a justice on Germany’s Federal Constitutional Court in 2011, Susanne Baer made history. She became only the second nominee of the country’s Green Party and the first out and elected lesbian and radical feminist to serve as one of the court’s 16 justices.

A portrait of Rossa Fanning, LLM ’00. A portrait of Rossa Fanning, LLM ’00.

Features Fall 2023

Rossa Fanning, LLM ’00: “I Am the Government's Lawyer”

When Rossa Fanning became attorney general of Ireland in late 2022, he didn’t need to endure the confirmation process of his counterpart in the United States. Instead, in two head-spinning days, he transitioned from his successful legal practice to a seat in the cabinet of Ireland’s prime minister.

Interior view of the Supreme Court Interior view of the Supreme Court

Features Spring/Summer 2023

Behind the Bench at the Supreme Court

For 20 years, Jeffrey Minear’s dealings at the Supreme Court followed a familiar pattern. As a litigator in the Office of the Solicitor General, he would prepare a brief, present argument, and await the ruling—a process he repeated more than 50 times. That all changed in 2006, when a new mandate became his daily task at the Court: perform such duties as may be assigned by the chief justice.

Jeff Titus walks in the woods after being exonerated. Jeff Titus walks in the woods after being exonerated.

Features Spring/Summer 2023

Jeff Titus Celebrates Life (on the) Outside

Titus, a Michigan Innocence Clinic client, was exonerated and released from prison in February. He was convicted in 2002 of killing two deer hunters in a state game area in the southeast corner of Kalamazoo County, Michigan.

Nadia Shihata, standing in front of a court house Nadia Shihata, standing in front of a court house

In Practice Spring/Summer 2023

Nadia Shihata, ’03: The Women Who Finally Stopped R. Kelly

Nadia Shihata, ’03, had taken down drug dealers, an Albanian crime boss, and other nefarious characters. This time, she and a team of prosecutors were leveling charges against Robert “R.” Kelly, an R&B superstar.

Christopher Perras, standing in front of the window in the University of Michigan law library Christopher Perras, standing in front of the window in the University of Michigan law library

In Practice Spring/Summer 2023

Christopher Perras, ’11: Hate on Trial

Christopher Perras, ’11, specializes in prosecuting hate crimes as a special litigation counsel in the Civil Rights Division at the Department of Justice.

Rebecca Richards, tribal chair for the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, performs a smudging ceremony to begin a meeting with Michigan Law students and members of the Pokagon Band tribal court in Dowagiac, Michigan. Rebecca Richards, tribal chair for the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, performs a smudging ceremony to begin a meeting with Michigan Law students and members of the Pokagon Band tribal court in Dowagiac, Michigan.

Features Fall 2022

Problem Solving Course Untangles a Web of Tribal Sovereignty and Policing

Earlier this year, students in Michigan Law’s Problem Solving Initiative course Policing by Indian Tribes had the opportunity to take a deep dive into the legal challenges that complicate law enforcement in Native American communities. In doing so, they found that there are rarely simple answers to the questions that arise.

Dan Bergeson Dan Bergeson

In Practice Spring 2021

Dan Bergeson, ’82: Adapting to a New Normal in California Courts

Going to trial in the era of COVID-19 has introduced a new twist into once-familiar proceedings, especially for the complex business litigation that is typical of Bergson’s practice. “You don’t have those face-to-face moments where you have that feeling of connectivity from seeing the judge or juror’s reaction.”