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AOI: Civil Rights

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Jeff Titus walks in the woods after being exonerated. Jeff Titus walks in the woods after being exonerated.

Features

Jeff Titus Celebrates Life (on the) Outside

Titus, a Michigan Innocence Clinic client, was exonerated and released from prison in February. He was convicted in 2002 of killing two deer hunters in a state game area in the southeast corner of Kalamazoo County, Michigan.

Harold Kennedy III, ’77 Harold Kennedy III, ’77

Class Note Fall 2016

Harold Kennedy III, ’77: A Groundbreaking Legal Career

From record-breaking verdicts to the Supreme Court to the Civil Rights Act, the career of Harold Kennedy III, ’77, has been transformational for North Carolina and the United States. 

Kerene Moore, ’05 Kerene Moore, ’05

Class Note Spring 2017

Kerene Moore, ’05: Opening the Courthouse Doors to Everyone

When the marriage equality movement started gaining momentum, Kerene Moore, ’05, saw an opportunity to help the LGBT community understand its rights, and to access them. It’s why she helped to create the LGBT Rights Project at the Jim Toy Community Center in Washtenaw County.

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In Memoriam

Professor Yale Kamisar

Yale Kamisar, a towering, beloved figure in the Law Quad and a nationally renowned scholar of constitutional law, died on January 30, 2022, in Ann Arbor. He was 92.

Beauty image of the Law School masonry Beauty image of the Law School masonry

@UMICHLAW Fall 2022

Addressing Communication Disabilities in Jails and Prisons

The Civil Rights Litigation Clearinghouse, which is housed at Michigan Law, published this summer the first in a series of white papers focused on criminal justice policy reform. It was drawn from the tens of thousands of litigation documents in the clearinghouse collection.

Paul Dimond, ’69 Paul Dimond, ’69

Impact Fall 2022

Alumnus Establishes New Prize to Bolster Scholarship at the Law School

Interpreting the Constitution and applying it to contemporary legal issues has been at the heart of all that Paul Dimond, ’69, has done in his career as a civil rights litigator, scholar, and private practitioner. 

Jodi Lopez, ’03 and Ben Friedman, ’13 Jodi Lopez, ’03 and Ben Friedman, ’13

In Practice Fall 2022

Litigating Death Row: A Long Road of Loss

For 16 years, Jodi Lopez, ’03, fought to save Matthew Reeves’s life—and twice his life was spared. But the hard-fought victories that Lopez, Ben Friedman, ’13, and others won on Reeves’s behalf were reversed by the US Supreme Court. For Lopez and Friedman, the case raises salient due process questions that warrant examination of and discussion about the American justice system.

Sign in front of house that reads "We believe Black Lives Matter. No Human is Illegal. Love is Love. Women's Rights are Human Rights. Science is Real. Water is Life. Injustice Anywhere is a Threat to Justice Everywhere. Sign in front of house that reads "We believe Black Lives Matter. No Human is Illegal. Love is Love. Women's Rights are Human Rights. Science is Real. Water is Life. Injustice Anywhere is a Threat to Justice Everywhere.

Features Fall 2022

A Legacy of Bigoted Deeds in Ann Arbor

The Hannah neighborhood near downtown Ann Arbor is relatively small, and its lawn signs reflect the progressive politics of residents. But that welcoming impression took a hit when neighbors started to learn last year that the deeds to their homes contain racist covenants once used for decades to exclude non-whites. The common reaction? Shock.

Jonathan Brater Jonathan Brater

In Practice

Jonathan Brater, ’11: Directing an Historic Election

When Jonathan Brater, ’11, was appointed Michigan’s director of elections in January 2020, the upcoming election cycle was already set to be groundbreaking. And then, on the night of the presidential primary in March, Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced the state’s first confirmed case of COVID-19. 

Ford Wheatley Ford Wheatley

Impact Spring 2021

For Denver-based Donor, Upholding Democratic Institutions Starts at Law School

Throughout his career in law and local government, Ford Wheatley, ’79, has firmly believed in the strength of American institutions and the nation’s democratic legacy. With a desire to ensure that this legacy endures for future generations, Wheatley established an endowed fund at the Law School to support research, teaching, and activities that reinforce the pillars of democracy.