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AOI: Human Rights

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Exterior architectural view of the Reading Room. Exterior architectural view of the Reading Room.

@UMICHLAW Fall 2023

At the Cutting Edge of International Law: Four Michigan Law Faculty Discuss Their Latest Work

The University’s founding statute in 1837 required the law department to hire a faculty member devoted to international law. Ever since, Michigan Law has been uniquely committed to the study of law beyond US borders. 

Kate Powers Kate Powers

Class Note Spring/Summer 2023

Kate Powers, ’20: Holding War Criminals to Account

Kate Powers, ’20, serves as the executive director of Global Accountability Network (GAN), an organization that works to bring justice to victims of war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide. 

Students visited Sylvester Manor, a plantation built by slaves whose history precedes the American Revolution. Students visited Sylvester Manor, a plantation built by slaves whose history precedes the American Revolution.

Features Spring/Summer 2023

Slavery’s Legacy in Architecture and Law

Slavery and the Built Environment, a Problem Solving Initiative class taught by Luis C.deBaca, ’93, examined the historical narrative of monuments in the US, including those with racist legacies. Students in the fall 2022 semester examined the history of Sylvester Manor to better understand how land use and regulation of supply chains have been shaped by slavery and its legacies. 

Azadeh Shahshahani Azadeh Shahshahani

Class Note Fall 2020

Azadeh Shahshahani: Protecting Immigrant Rights Across the U.S. South

Azadeh Shahshahani, ’04, a prolific writer and speaker on the subject of immigrant rights, was first drawn to Project South because of the organization’s work to combat Islamophobia.

George Barchini George Barchini

Class Note Spring/Summer 2018

George Barchini, ’15: Striking a Balance with Big Law and Public Interest

Near the end of a long week in Laredo, Texas, George Barchini pulled an all-nighter—but not for the reasons typical of young associates at Big Law firms. Instead, he was trying to stop the deportation of a Central American woman.

Rep. John E. Porter in an official looking hall way Rep. John E. Porter in an official looking hall way

In Memoriam Fall 2022

Rep. John E. Porter, ’61

Rep. John E. Porter, ’61, a Republican who served for more than two decades in the US House of Representatives as the representative for Illinois’s 10th congressional district, died on June 3, 2022. He was 87. 

Craig Kramer Craig Kramer

In Practice

Craig Kramer, ’87: Mental Health Ambassador

“My overarching goal is to help transform mental health care worldwide. It’s broken everywhere, and it is a global problem,” says Craig Kramer, ’87, Johnson & Johnson’s (J&J) first mental health ambassador. But raising awareness about and erasing the stigma of mental illness were not part of his plan as a Michigan Law graduate—nor was it where he started.

Image of a bag on a table with books and papers overflowing out of the bag Image of a bag on a table with books and papers overflowing out of the bag

Cover Story Winter 2019

Immigration Law: Protecting Process and Changing Lives

Immigration news is everywhere. It’s a complicated issue. While the pages of this magazine could be filled with stories about the immigration work being done by Michigan Law graduates, we’ve chosen to highlight the efforts of a few individuals closer to home who are working to protect process. 

Albie Sachs Albie Sachs

@UMICHLAW Spring/Summer 2018

Anti-Apartheid Leader, Former Constitutional Court Justice Delivers Bishop Lecture

Justice Albie Sachs knew Nelson Mandela “before he was the Nelson Mandela,” and during this year’s William W. Bishop Lecture in International Law, he regaled a standing-room-only crowd with tales from the frontline of the anti-apartheid movement and South Africa’s burgeoning democracy.

International Dignitaries and MLaw Students Develop Guidelines on Refugee Protections International Dignitaries and MLaw Students Develop Guidelines on Refugee Protections

@UMICHLAW

International Dignitaries and Michigan Law Students Develop Guidelines on Refugee Protections

Hungary, after lining 109 miles of its border with razor wire, passed a law requiring asylum-seekers to remain in camps constructed from shipping containers while their cases are reviewed—a process that could take years. Human rights groups condemned the action, but does it violate international law?